Judas Priest – ‘Angel of Retribution’ (2005) – Album Review (The Complete Albums Collection Series)

After the 1990 album, ‘Painkiller’, Rob Halford left Judas Priest and the band continued on for 11 years with the singer Tim “Ripper” Owens. Rob went on and did his own thing whether it was the band Fight, Two or band Halford. Judas Priest did two albums with Ripper during this time, but the fans were screaming for Halford and Priest to reunite. Rob had wanted that for a long time, but was too afraid to reach out (at least that is what he says in his book). However, eventually it happened. Rob Halford was to rejoin Priest and in 2003, it finally happened.

Judas Priest toured a little and then went in to the studio to record their new album ‘Angel of Retribution’. They recorded from October to December of 2004 and the album was finally released on February 23, 2005 and to quite acclaim. It went to #13 on the Billboard 200 Charts and Priest were back. Rob brought over Roy Z as the producer who also mixed and engineered the album as well. Roy Z was the guitar player in Rob’s band Halford and he produced several of those albums as well.

I read somewhere that the album artwork was a continuation of the angel from ‘Sad Wings of Destiny’. This time the angel has transformed in to steel as she is rising out of the ashes and becoming the angel of retribution. Who knows if that is true, but cool to think that it is a reference to that album.

After 11 years apart, what would the new Priest sound like was the question of the day. Judas Priest would come out and deliver a massively heavy album and usher their sound in to the 21st Century! Rob Halford, Glenn Tipton, K.K. Downing, Ian Hill and Scott Travis are ready to rock.

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Slaughter – The Albums Ranked Worst to First

Founding members Mark Slaughter and Dana Strum were in a little band called Vinnie Vincent’s Invasion.  When that imploded due to its namesake, they decided to form a new band and they liked Mark’s last name and so it became Slaughter.  The decision was easy because the VVI label, Chrysalis, just transferred the Invasion contract to them and let them form a band. Pretty easy!!  They added guitarist Tim Kelly who has since passed away in 1998 and drummer Blas Elias.

The band put out 5 albums over their career from 1988 to today.  The band showed up on the scene with their first album in 1990 and their second came in 1992. The problem was not the albums, but the timing.  The market was so oversaturated with these 80’s Rock bands that the tide was turning. Grunge showed up on the scene and wiped them out of existence on MTV and the radio.  But they didn’t stop.  The continued to release albums throughout the 90’s and maybe someday we will get a new one.  For now, we will discuss and rank their 90’s output.  I hope you enjoy.

THE WORST – ‘FEAR NO EVIL (1995):

The band’s third album was called “Fear No Evil” and released in 1995.  I had already checked out by this time and didn’t even know they had an album.  Listening to this now, it really isn’t that bad.  They don’t really have a terrible album. This one sounded like the first two, but I think the biggest problem was Mark’s vocals were a little more shrill then usual.  Mark’s vocals are a little different and not for everyone. They never really bothered me except this one was a little too much. Continue reading “Slaughter – The Albums Ranked Worst to First”

My Sunday Song – “Won’t Get Fooled Again” by The Who

For My Sunday Song #101, we go back to picking some of my favorite songs and no theme behind these next 10.  First up is “Won’t Get Fooled Again” by The Who.  The song is off their album ‘Who’s Next’ and was the final song on the album as well as a single which wen tall the way to #15 on the Billboard Hot 100.  If you aren’t familiar with it, you might know it as the song on the opening credits for the CBS show CSI: Miami.

The song was written during the ‘Lifehouse’ project the Who were working on.  This was another rock opera following the success of ‘Tommy’; however, the project was later scrapped.  This song was so good that they felt it would work as a standalone song on the album that became ‘Who’s Next’.

The song is about a revolution and you can see that through the lyrics.  The beginning of the song is of course the beginning of the uprising of the revolution.  The middle of the song has the revolution over with the new people in power and the song ends with the new people in power being just as bad as the previous people so they have to start a new revolution.  It is a stark look at the reality of government.  You might vote someone new into office, but they are just as bad or worse than who was previously in power.  It is a constant struggle across the globe.

The song itself is absolutely amazing.  It is over 8 minutes long or you can get the single edit which is shortened to a measly 3:36, but you miss the whole power behind the song.  The original “full” version is a stroke of genius musically.  Pete outdoes himself with both his guitar work and his work on the synthesizer which is the main focus of the song.  The synthesizer is symbolic of the revolution and you can track the progression with the impact of it during the song.

Won't_get_fooled_again

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