Whitesnake – ‘Ready An’ Willing” – Album Review (The David Coverdale Series)

A couple months after releasing ‘Lovehunter’ in October 1979, the band was back in the studio by December to start recording the follow-up, ‘Ready an’ Willing’.  The band finished up recording in February under the hand of returning producer Martin Birch who has handled all the Snake albums up to this point.

By the time they were back in the studio, drummer Duck Dowle was out and former David Coverdale and Jon Lord bandmate, Ian Paice, was in the band.  That now made 1/2 of the band as former Deep Purple members.  And if I am not mistaken, the press played that up which didn’t quite sit well with a couple of the band members.

The album cover for this one was a much more toned-down cover after the controversy the band received for the naked woman straddling a snake (side note: one of my favorites).  This was a simple black & white drawing of the band with the Whitesnake logo.  Nothing fancy and quite bland.  Now, that wasn’t the only controversy the band had.  Their lyrics were blasted as well for their whole “cock rock” style and womanizing.  And I am not sure this album would not help them in that matter. Oh well.

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The inner album sleeve gave us the songs from each side along with the lyrics.  It also included who had each solo on the songs which I love that fact.  There was no winding snake from one side to the other, instead we get pictures of the band with Coverdale, Lord and Murray on the front and Marsden, Moody and Paice on the back.

The album was the first one to see any real success for the band.  They reached #6 in the UK and actually finally charted in the US at #90 thanks in part to the first single which we will discuss shortly.  The band was finally starting to break outside the UK which is what they wanted, but it would still be a few more years before they became one of the top acts in the world.

SIDE ONE:

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The band’s first single and first hit outside the UK was the song “Fool For Your Loving”.  Yes, Whitesnake fans that came on board in the late 80’s know this song from the album ‘Slip of the Tongue’.  However, this was the original and first release of the song which went to #13 in the UK and #53 in the US.  The song was written by Marsden (who had the riffs and the verses), Moody (who wrote the bridge) and Coverdale (who did the lyrics). The funny thing about the song is that it was originally written for BB King, however, they soon realized the song was too good to pass up…and they were right.

This version of the song is more bluesy and has a nice groove and not as rocking as the hair metal version, but that is okay.  You have Bernie belting out a great solo that is so different than Vai’s version.  Since I grew up with the ‘Slip of the Tongue’ version, this version feels like a demo to me and I am actually turn to which one I like more.  This fits the sound of the band at this point in their career and the other fits that version of the band.  Tough choice…I will let you decide.

The next track is “Sweet Talker” which was only released in the US as a single, but didn’t really do anything.  This is another song with rather suggestive lyrics and would not stop the controversy on their womanizing lyrics.  As a teenager, this would have been great.  it is a fun rocking track and it has Jon Lord delivering something he does best…massive keyboard solos.  And I don’t want to leave out the great slide guitar work of Micky Moody, always love his slide guitar.  This to me is a classic sounding Whitesnake song and one of my favorites on the album…one of many.

The title track, “Ready an’ Willing”, has such a driving groove to it.  The blues feel in David’s vocals and lyrics and the sonics of the song, make it a memorable song and why it was released as the 2nd single. Moody handled the solo which was short and perfect for the song.  Although the single didn’t do that well, it is still a beast of a track on the album.

Then we get to “Carry the Load” and I have to say I am not real thrilled with this one.  Too generic and falls very flat for me.  This song feels more like one of David’s solo songs and could have been on ‘Northwinds’.  It feels out of place here.

Another favorite on the album is the song ‘Blindman’ which is a re-work of the song from David’s first solo album called ‘Whitesnake’.  In what could be David’s best performance to date as he brings so much more emotion and pain in his delivery, this song is the gem in a album full of them.  It has a slow groove and is another blues track which has the band at its best.  Bernie’s understated solo was what the song needed.  It fit perfectly with the vibe.  The song was great on the solo album, but taken to another level here.

SIDE TWO:

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First up on Side Two is “Ain’t’ Gonna Cry No More” has David singing along to the acoustic guitar before Jon Lord comes in with some soft sounding keyboards in what is starting out as a beautiful ballad.  That is until Ian Paice brings it up a notch with his drums and it turns in to pure rock & roll beast with the help of Micky Moody on the solo.  The album is quickly becoming my favorite of the Whitesnake albums so far with songs like this.

“Love Man” is a more traditional blues song with a foot stomping beat and some gritty slide guitar.  It was what I know and love as blues.  Lyrically, it is pure and utter cheese and David delivers it as such, however, I kinda like it.  It grabs you and pulls you in whether you want to or not.

“Black and Blue” feels like you are at a honky tonk with the whole live, bar-band feel to it including some piano playing by Jon Lord.  Adding the cheering bar crowd to the mix made it feel right at home in the bar.  It is a fun, good time track.

And the album ends with “She’s a Woman”, which opens with Lord on the keyboards and then gets turned up a notch when the drums and guitar riffs kick in.  Now the highlight is that Jon Lord turns in the best solo of the album.  He goes to town and takes you on a magical keyboard journey.  Although not the best song on the album, it highlights Lord and that is good enough for me.

Track Listing:

  1. Fool For Your Loving – Keeper
  2. Sweet Talker – Keeper
  3. Ready an’ Willing – Keeper
  4. Carry Your Load – Delete
  5. Blindman – Keeper
  6. Ain’t Gonna Cry No More – Keeper
  7. Love Man – Keeper
  8. Black and Blue – Keeper
  9. She’s a Woman – Keeper

The track is a wonderful 8 out of 9 tracks are keepers or 89%.  The songs are the strongest yet of the Whitesnake albums so far.  There are some Essential Whitesnake songs on here, more so than the others and this album gets better with every listen.  The album was missing some dual guitar solos with Marsden and Moody which I think adds to the songs.  The album was also lacking a Bernie Marsden lead vocal song…okay, it really isn’t missing that I guess.  Overall, this is a killer album and I will rate it a 4.0 out of 5.0 Stars.  As much as I love it, there are some I like better but this is near the top.

 

Up next…Whitesnake – ‘Live…in the Heart of the City’.

The David Coverdale Series:

  1. Deep Purple – Burn
  2. Deep Purple – Stormbringer
  3. Deep Purple – Come Taste the Band
  4. Deep Purple – Made in Europe
  5. David Coverdale – Whitesnake
  6. Deep Purple – Last Concert in Japan
  7. David Coverdale – Northwinds
  8. David Coverdale’s Whitesnake – Snakebite
  9. Whitesnake – Trouble
  10. Whitesnake – Lovehunter
  11. Whitesnake – Ready an’ Willing

Other David Coverdale Albums reviewed – (Box Sets and Bootlegs):

  1. Whitesnake – 1987 (30th Anniversary Edition) – Box Set
  2. Whitesnake – Slide It In (35th Anniversary Edition) – Box Set
  3. Whitesnake – Unzipped – Box Set
  4. Whitesnake (Snake) – Still of the Night Live in Battle Creek, Mich. July 26, 1987 (Bootleg)
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Whitesnake – ‘Lovehunter’ – Album Review (The David Coverdale Series)

In May 1979, the band went back in to the studio to record the follow-up to ‘Trouble’.  In a few short weeks they were done and on October 1st, 1979, the band released “Lovehunter’ to the masses.  The album was recorded by Martin Birch who did ‘Trouble and they recorded at Clearwell Castle in Gloucestershire in the Rolling Stones Mobile and it was later mixed at Central Recorders Studio and Sauna in London.  Sauna???  That is freaking weird.  Anyway, the album did modestly and reached #29 in the UK Chart.  Not a smashing success, but it did chart.

The album was rather controversial.  Not for the music, no that wasn’t it.  It was that cover.  And oh what a cover!!  It was a picture of a beautiful lady straddling a huge snake.  Oh, and she is naked!!  If only the U.S. had this album back in the day…why couldn’t my brothers have owned this one because at 10 years old, I would have really loved this cover.  The artist was Chris Achilleos who was known for fantasy artwork and I believe he was very distraught over the controversy as it was the last album cover he did until 2003 when he did the album cover for Glenn Hughes’ album ‘Once and Future King Part 1’.

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This album would end up being Duck Dowle’s last album as the drummer for Whitesnake as he was replaced shortly after the release by former Deep Purple drummer Ian Paice which would bring the total of ex-Deep Purple members to three.

Continue reading “Whitesnake – ‘Lovehunter’ – Album Review (The David Coverdale Series)”

Whitesnake – ‘Trouble’ – Album Review (The David Coverdale Series)

Before David’s second solo album, ‘Trouble’, came out in March 1978, David had already put together a band and the delivered an E.P. called ‘Snakebite’ just a few months later under the name Whitesnake.  And by September of that same year, they had a full length album ready to go.  The album was produced by Martin Birch and recorded in only 10 days at the Central Recorders Studio in London over those Summer months.

The album was called ‘Trouble’ and was released in September 1978.  The album name came from one of the songs, but it was inspired by the fact that David had a son during this time and that could only mean one thing…TROUBLE!!

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Now the band had a new member by the name of Jon Lord on keyboards.  He replaced former keyboard player Pete Solley. For those that have followed David’s career, Jon Lord is no stranger as he was the keyboard player with David on the Deep Purple Mark III and IV versions of the band.  Jon wasn’t there for the recording of the album, however, they overdubbed his parts in the songs after the fact so he could be on the album as he was now a member and thankfully so in my opinion.

The album I picked up had a nice cut-out in the top right corner, but overall still in great shape.  It still even included the vinyl inner sleeve which consists of the bands lyrics for the songs and writing credits. The really cool thing on the lyrics was at the end of each song, it let you know who did the solo as it was usually a toss-up between Moody and Marsden and occasionally Lord.

 

The band for this album consisted of the following:

  • David Coverdale – Lead Vocals
  • David Dowle – Drums
  • Jon Lord – Keyboards
  • Bernie Marsden – Guitar
  • Micky Moody – Guitar
  • Neil Murray – Bass

Now it is time to talk about the music…

SIDE ONE:

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The album kicks off with a rockin’ riff on “Take Me With You”.  This high energy rocker comes at you at breakneck speed and tempo that it immediately gets you moving.  David sounds fresh and throws in a little moaning at the end.  There is so much going on musically and always something new each time you listen.  The solo on this one is actually a drum solo by Dave “Duck” Dowle, but there are still a lot of guitars including some slide on it so don’t fret.

Next up is “Love to Keep You Warm”.  A little slower than the previous and a little more blues feel to it.  A nice groove by Dave and Neil.  The song is a little poppy at times, but manages to hold on to being a rocker thanks to Bernie Marsden’s guitar solo.

“Lie Down (A Modern Love Song)” is interesting as it is more pop than blues or even rock.  It is a very fast tempo’d love song. The vocals at times have this whole Elton John feel to them and even the vibe of the song with Lord’s piano feels like him as well.  Not that it is a bad thing.

Then we get the horrible cover of the Beatles’ “Day Tripper”.  It is…let’s say…not good.  It is uninspiring and bluh.  The adding in of the Framptonesque Talk Box doesn’t help and I really can’t stand it.  I hope that point is coming across. Skip/Delete whatever you do, just avoid it.

The first side ends with the speedy “Nighthawk (Vampire Blues)”.  Now the song is so fast that it doesn’t feel bluesy at all to me.  It is rocker, for sure, but not blues.  The drumming on this is sensational and the guitar work is fantastic.  David sings a hundred miles an hour and you get exhausted after trying to sing the chorus as fast as David.  I really dig this one and it even has a solo by Jon Lord to help push it over the top even more.

SIDE TWO:

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Side Two opens up with Deep Purple style song “The Time is Right For Love”.  It has a nice blues guitar feel to it and has a great beat and tempo that it get stuck in your head and you sing it even when the song is done.  On this one, the guitar solos are done in harmony between both Moody and Marsden which is the beauty of having two guitarists.  David again performs brilliantly and sounds so good on this one as well.

Next up we get the title track, “Trouble” which is the most blues worthy song of the bunch. David’s lyrics mention a gambler’s son which he uses a lot over the next few decades.  The song feels a little like Purple’s “Mistreated” or at least in the same realm of comparability for style and form.  The solo on this one goes to Marsden and it is fantastic. He lays down some riffs that have great melody and you could sing along with it if you sing your solos…I do every so often.

The coolest song on the album is “Belgian Tom’s Hat Trick” which is a full assault of an instrumental with 3 different solos.  One for Moody, One for Lord and One for Marsden.  I don’t see it as out of place as Purple threw in an instrumental on ‘Burn’ and this one is way better.  I really love when Jon Lord lays it down and he does just that.  The guitar’s have a riff that plays through-out that is the main feel for the song and everything is played beautifully off of that riff.

Then we get a change of pace with Bernie Marsden on vocals instead of Coverdale.  The song is called “Free Flight” and is interesting to say the least.  Not necessarily in a good way interesting.  It does have some great drumming and music, but vocally, ehh!  There is a reason David is the lead singer.  I think Bernie sounds good on the verses, it is just a horrible chorus. Oh yeah, and Bernie gets the solo so this one is the Bernie Marsden show.

The final song is “Don’t Mess With Me” and David is back with all his glory as we have missed him for the last two songs.  This one is a pure rocker, with a great rhythm and groove and filled with two totally brilliant guitar solos for both Moody and Marsden.  What a way to end the album.  They give you everything you would want and end the album on an utter high note.

Track Listing:

  1. Take Me With You – Keeper
  2. Love to Keep You Warm – Keeper
  3. Lie Down (A Modern Love Song) – Keeper
  4. Day Tripper – Delete
  5. Nighthawk (Vampire Blues) – Keeper
  6. The Time is Right for Love – Keeper
  7. Trouble – Keeper
  8. Belgian Tom’s Hat Trick – Keeper
  9. Free Flight – Delete
  10. Don’t Mess With Me – Keeper

For a track score, you get 8 out of 10 songs or 80% which is pretty solid.  However, there a couple things to note.  The guitar playing is sensational on this album, but the guitar sound was lacking a little punch in sonics.  Also, there are no real stand out tracks that I would consider Whitesnake classics, although, there are some contenders.  For those couple reasons, I am giving it a 3.5 out of 5.0 Stars.  This an awesome first step for the band and a sign of great things to come, but I really liked the ‘Snakebite’ EP a lot better as it was more blues tinged then this album was.  Still this is a solid release and a must have in the collection, I just think they do much better in the coming years.

Up next…Whitesnake – ‘Lovehunter’.

The David Coverdale Series:

  1. Deep Purple – Burn
  2. Deep Purple – Stormbringer
  3. Deep Purple – Come Taste the Band
  4. Deep Purple – Made in Europe
  5. David Coverdale – Whitesnake
  6. Deep Purple – Last Concert in Japan
  7. David Coverdale – Northwinds
  8. David Coverdale’s Whitesnake – Snakebite
  9. Whitesnake – Trouble

Other David Coverdale Albums reviewed – (Box Sets and Bootlegs):

  1. Whitesnake – 1987 (30th Anniversary Edition) – Box Set
  2. Whitesnake – Slide It In (35th Anniversary Edition) – Box Set
  3. Whitesnake – Unzipped – Box Set
  4. Whitesnake (Snake) – Still of the Night Live in Battle Creek, Mich. July 26, 1987 (Bootleg)

David Coverdale’s Whitesnake – ‘Snakebite’ – Album Review (The David Coverdale Series)

After David Coverdale finished recording his last solo album, ‘Northwinds’, he found that his touring band was already trying out new songs and ‘Northwinds’ hadn’t even come out yet.  The album finally came out in March of 1978, but by this time, David had already figured that his current touring line-up was already a band and needed to record its own album, which it did in March and April of 1978.  By June 1978, the band released a four song E.P. titled ‘Snakebite’. It was listed as David Coverdale’s Whitesnake and it was the start of something amazing.

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By September 1978, the album was released as an 8 song double E.P..  That is the copy I have and I will be reviewing.  If I ever find an original ‘Snakebite’, you can bet your ass I will be grabbing it.

The 8 song double E.P. has the 4 original songs plus it steals 4 tracks from David’s last solo album ‘Northwinds’.  It took the 4 best and now we have a pretty smokin’ album.

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Since this was now a band, let’s see who was in it at this time.

  • David Coverdale – vocals
  • Micky Moody – guitar
  • Bernie Marsden – guitar
  • Neil Murray – bass guitar
  • Dave Dowle – drums
  • Pete Solley – keyboards

Yes, it is a quite a lethal combo on guitars with Micky Moody and Bernie Marsden.  That double guitar work is what makes Whitesnake so incredible.  This line-up changes again for the next album, but by only one person and that person makes a huge difference.  That is a little teaser on what is to come with the next review.

The insert I have for the vinyl sleeve is still in tact and has the lyrics to all the songs and writing credits.  And I think my album might have been a promo or on a cut-out sell as the bottom right corner has a nice slice out of it.

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Okay, enough chit chat, let’s get to the heart of the matter…the music.

SIDE ONE:

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The first song is “Come On” written by David Coverdale and Bernie Marsden and right away you can hear how big the guitar sound is.  The song is a pure rock song with a great groove and a blistering solo.  A great opener and I love the fact that David has two Deep Purple references in the song…“Soldier of Fortune” and “Gypsy”.

Then we get into the Coverdale penned “Bloody Mary” which opens with a piano and Pete slamming the keys.  Jump up and dance and feel the music. It is pure joy and magic and two songs in and I am already loving every minute of it.

David goes back to his blues roots as he covers Bobby Bland’s “Ain’t No Love in the Heart of the City” written by Michael Price and Dan Wise.  This love song is down and dirty, a blues rock song slowed down into a beautiful ballad.  Oh, and the solo…wow!  It fit the song so well and pulled out even more emotion.  Not even an original, this song is a signature Whitesnake classic as they are still known to pull this one out and play it live.

The last song from the original E.P. is “Steal Away”.  The writing credits on this one are for everyone in the band which is nice to see.  The opening riff on the  slide guitar is nothing short of spectacular.  The song is gritty and a dirty and I love the blues rock feel.  David’s vocals are spot on and for me this is my highlight on the whole album.

SIDE TWO:

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Side two has 4 songs from ‘Northwinds’ as I mentioned earlier.  The first one up is “Keep on Giving Me Love”.  It has a funkalicious guitar riff by Moody that could have come from Glenn Hughes playbook.  “Keep on Giving Me Love” has a great groove and is a rocking opening track and excites me as what is to come.  Coverdale’s vocals have an edginess to it and Moody rips through a nice solo.

“Queen of Hearts” is full of pianos and there is a nice bass thump before the song slams into gear and really gets going.  A groovy and bluesy song that becomes a banging good time.

“Only My Soul” is a fantastic rock ballad with a great soulful feel to it in the guitars playing.  This has Whitesnake all over it.  Alan Spenner, on bass, lays down a nice groove with the keyboards playing along with it during the musical interlude before David comes back and brings it home.

The final track is the most rocking song, “Breakdown”.  It is pure Whitesnake.  Moody & Coverdale hit it out of the park with this one and they rock it out like nothing else. The song is about the downfall of Deep Purple. The 4 songs pulled off ‘Northwinds’ were the most rocking tracks and 3 of the 4 were written by Moody and Coverdale.  When he writes with the guitarists, we tend to get the most kick ass tracks.

Track Listing:

  1. Come On – Keeper
  2. Bloody Mary – Keeper
  3. Ain’t No Love in the Heart of the City – Keeper
  4. Steal Away – Keeper
  5. Keep On Giving Me Love – Keeper
  6. Queen of Hearts – Keeper
  7. Only My Soul – Keeper
  8. Breakdown – Keeper

Track score is easily a 100% with 8 out of 8 tracks being keepers.  As far as the albums overall score, I will break it down in to two scores.  As a 4 song E.P., this is easily a 5 out of 5 Stars as those 4 songs on Side One are spectacular.  What a slamming introduction to the band.  Now, as an 8 song double E.P., I will ding it a little as I think only two of the extra 4 songs are Whitesnake contenders and the other two are just good songs, but not necessarily Whitesnake material.  For that, I give the version I have a 4.5 out of 5.0 Stars which is still pretty freaking great!!  This is a an absolute must have for any Whitesnake fan.

Up next…Whitesnake – ‘Trouble’.

The David Coverdale Series:

  1. Deep Purple – Burn
  2. Deep Purple – Stormbringer
  3. Deep Purple – Come Taste the Band
  4. Deep Purple – Made in Europe
  5. David Coverdale – Whitesnake
  6. Deep Purple – Last Concert in Japan
  7. David Coverdale – Northwinds
  8. David Coverdale’s Whitesnake – Snakebite

Other David Coverdale Albums reviewed – (Box Sets and Bootlegs):

  1. Whitesnake – 1987 (30th Anniversary Edition) – Box Set
  2. Whitesnake – Slide It In (35th Anniversary Edition) – Box Set
  3. Whitesnake – Unzipped – Box Set
  4. Whitesnake (Snake) – Still of the Night Live in Battle Creek, Mich. July 26, 1987 (Bootleg)

David Coverdale – ‘Northwinds’ – Album Review (The David Coverdale Series)

After ‘Whitesnake’, David went in a recorded his follow-up solo release, ‘Northwinds’.  This was around March / April of 1977; however, the album wouldn’t be released until a year later in March of 1978. I am not sure why the long delay in release, but the bad news for the release was by the time it did come out, Coverdale was done as a solo artist.  He had already pieced a band together that would go on to become WHITESNAKE!  I will save that for the next release which came out in June of 1978 just 3 months later.

The album did a little better than the debut and sound wise is more of the same. Okay, maybe the production is a little better and the sound starts to get some of the Whitesnake sounds, but not entirely.  David is still finding himself with this record which doesn’t mean its bad, it is far from that.  It is an interesting look at early David, pre-Whitesnake, and a glimpse into his musical tastes.

I have this on vinyl and it is part of a 2LP set including both David’s early solo albums, ‘Whitesnake’ and ‘Northwinds’.  It is a sweet set released in 1988 at the height of the band Whitesnake and they were trying to capitalize on Coverdale’s popularity.  I like having this set as these two albums really should be played together to get the full impact of his early songs and to see a young Coverdale growing into a fantastic songwriter.

 

Continue reading “David Coverdale – ‘Northwinds’ – Album Review (The David Coverdale Series)”

Deep Purple – ‘Last Concert in Japan’ – Album Review (The David Coverdale Series)

‘Last Concert in Japan’ only saw a release due to the death of guitarist Tommy Bolin who died in December of 1976.  The album was released shortly after in March of 1977 in Japan.  The record company was in a rush to capitalize on his death is all I can think why this was released. The band was done, all parties had moved on and the record company thought it would be an easy cash grab.  Now I have no proof, this is pure speculation but it is what record companies do.

This album captures the Mark IV line-ups last show in Japan as the title says at the Budokan Hall which I believe they set a record for attendance at that time.  The release is not a full show and it was streamlined down to fit on only one LP.

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There are a lot of problems with this album.  First off, the mix. It is pretty crappy as the release was done in such a hurry that the master tracking really suffered and let me tell you it shows.  And if that wasn’t enough, let me just say the guitar playing is less then stellar and I believe Jon Lord was used a lot more in places that there should have been more guitar.  The reason being is Tommy Bolin had been doing drugs quite heavily the night before and according to Glenn Hughes, he feel asleep on his arm for 8 hours and couldn’t play.  And based on what I hear, I believe he might be telling the truth.

Continue reading “Deep Purple – ‘Last Concert in Japan’ – Album Review (The David Coverdale Series)”

David Coverdale – ‘Whitesnake’ – Album Review (The David Coverdale Series)

The Deep Purple tour for the album, ‘Come Taste the Band’ ended in March of 1976.  After that tour, we saw the end of Deep Purple as the band called it quits (at least until the early 80’s).  David Coverdale was now without a band, but music was still in his blood and new music was ready to come out.  In August of that year, David entered the studio and recorded his debut solo album called ‘White Snake’.

Hmmm…that name rings a bell.  Where have we heard that before?  Oh yeah, the album name would become the inspiration for his band name which would come a couple years later.  For now, we will focus on the album, ‘Whitesnake’.

The album was released on February 9, 1977 and the album cover featured David on the cover with a “white” snake curled up behind him ready to strike.  The album I have is actually a 1988 release consisting of a 2LP set with both ‘Whitesnake’ and David’s follow-up solo album ‘Northwinds’ which we will discuss later.  The package was a gatefold and consisted of commentary by Mark Rutherford.

The album was produced by ex-Deep Purple bassist Roger Glover which is a cool Purple connection.  But as we know with David, he likes to attract great guitarists and use them to help him write the songs.  On this album, that guitarists was Micky Moody formerly of the band Juicy Lucy.  Moody and Coverdale wrote 4 of the 9 songs together and this pattern of finding great guitarists would continue on until today (2019).

Continue reading “David Coverdale – ‘Whitesnake’ – Album Review (The David Coverdale Series)”

Deep Purple – ‘Made in Europe’ – Album Review (The David Coverdale Series)

Now that Deep Purple was defunct, the record company needed to release something I am sure so why not a live album.  In October 1975, ‘Made in Europe’ was released.  The recording from April 3rd – April 7th on some of the final dates that Ritchie Blackmore would play as he left the band shortly after.  So, with that being said, the line is the Mark III lineup of the band consisting of Ritchie, David Coverdale, Glenn Hughes, Jon Lord and Ian Paice.

The show was recorded from 3 different shows that took place on April 3rd, 1975 in Graz, Austria, April 5th in  Saarbrücken, Germany and finally on April 7th at the Palais des Sports in Paris, France.  According to the album jacket, the album was recorded using the “Rolling Stones” mobile truck.  And it has also been discussed that there were some heavy overdubbing and cleaning up of the set including the audience with the crowd noise and applause…but this is the 70’s what live album wasn’t retouched (ahem…Kiss).

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The album is only a single LP and only includes 5 songs with a total run time of 45:47 which means the average song length over 9 minutes so the band plays the heck out of these songs which is really what a Deep Purple live album is all about.  The band had huge success with the prior live album ‘Made in Japan’ and although this is a good release, it isn’t as good as the Japan release.

Continue reading “Deep Purple – ‘Made in Europe’ – Album Review (The David Coverdale Series)”

August Purchases – CD & Vinyl

I realized I have been making a lot of purchases and yet not everything makes its way on to the site.  I figured I would do a wrap up each month of all my purchasing I have made even if they made it on the site during the month or even might make it on to the site down the road.

I like to buy vinyl, but I will also pick up CDs as well because sometimes those albums are not on vinyl and sometimes the CD package gives me a little more than the vinyl would like having a DVD included.  One such release was done for that very reason.

The first being The Traveling Wilburys. I couldn’t believe I didn’t have these albums on vinyl and I could probably get them; however, I was at the record store and in the used section was The Traveling Wilburys Collection which included both albums and a DVD with a brief documentary and some music videos and all for a price well cheaper than getting these on vinyl with no DVD.  I grabbed it!!

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Next up was one I have been wanting to grab as well on vinyl, but when I saw this on CD and at the price, I grabbed it.  I got it for less than $8 and considering the album is over $80 now (at least on Amazon), I thought who needs a vinyl.  The album is Jimmy Page & the Black Crowes Live at the Greek.  I had heard a lot of good things about it, so why not.

Continue reading “August Purchases – CD & Vinyl”

Deep Purple – ‘Come Taste the Band’ – Album Review (The David Coverdale Series)

Ritchie Blackmore left the band after the last album, ‘Stormbringer’, due to creative differences with David Coverdale and Glenn Hughes.  I find this funny considering Ritchie brought them in to help take the band in a new direction and Ritchie ended up not liking that direction.  So Deep Purple was done…or were they?

David talked Jon Lord and Ian Paice to continue and they did.  Now before they could continue, they needed a new guitar player and in comes Tommy Bolin, a bloody American.  This upset quite a few diehard UK Purple fans.  And probably part of the reason the album didn’t do that well.

David had heard Tommy’s playing on Jazz fusion drummer Billy Cobham’s solo album called ‘Spectrum’ and thought he would be perfect.  And we all know now that David has an ear for great guitarists (can you say John Sykes and Steve Vai to name a couple). Tommy was a great guitar player and it is too bad his heroin addiction would take a life way too soon a little over a year after the album’s release.

Deep Purple would continue and this would end up being the first Deep Purple album to not feature either Ritchie Blackmore or even Ian Gillan.  As a result, a lot of people don’t really consider this a Deep Purple album.  Now that is crazy because if they consider ‘Burn’ to be a Deep Purple album, then this one is as well as the sound and feel is so similar to that album and quite possibly could be better.  I know I might be in the minority, but I really like this album.

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Continue reading “Deep Purple – ‘Come Taste the Band’ – Album Review (The David Coverdale Series)”